The envelope is old and brown. It is nothing more than a regular number 10 (I think that's right) envelope. My Great Grandmother Swiss had it first, then my Grandmother Kelly (her daughter), then my Dad and now me. I received it when we moved Mom and Dad to Florida in January, 1998. I did not expect to be using the envelope's contents as quickly as I did when Dad passed it on to me.

Dad gave it to me one day in December of 1997. The postmark on the envelope is December 6, 1948. The address, which will seem strange in this day of exact addresses and even nine digit zip codes, is simply Emma C. Swiss, Bloomingburg, Ohio. No street address or zip code was evidently needed back then. The envelope was sent by Ulric T. Acton, Auditor, Fayette County, Washington C. H., Ohio.

On the front of the envelope written in pencil is "Cemetry Deed." Underneath this, in my Dad's distinctive script, is "Dad's & W. A. Swiss." Farther below, in my own hand, is written "Paint Twp Cem. London." Inside the envelope are two cemetery deeds, one dated June 5, 1937 and the other June 4, 1953. The 1953 deed was purchased by my Pawpaw Kelly, Dad's dad. That lot is where my Aunt Phyllis and her husband, Granny and Pawpaw and Mom and Dad have their lots.

The other deed was purchased by my Great Grandparents, W. A. and Emma Swiss. There are two burial plots still located there. My wife and are now wondering if we will use them or try to find some closer to where we feel our family will be living. Two old deeds to two old burial plots in an old cemetery that are being kept in an old envelope by a man who keeps getting older and closer to using them. My question is, "For how long?"

"Behold, I tell you a mystery; we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed." 1 Corinthians 15:51, 52 Funny isn't it. Papers that have been passed through the family for four generations which, when used next, may be five generations and one day they be totally worthless. It puts life in perspective. Some things are old and cherished. Some are eternal and desired.