This time of year always brings to light the inner-emotions of every human being. For better or worse, angry or happy, blessed or starving, employed or not, living among the devastation of war or sitting underneath the comfortable blanket of peace, we all have something to be thankful for and look forward to the upcoming days of the holiday season.

It’s been a crazy year for many. The aggressive political election and its results left millions wondering what’s next for our beloved country. The images from overseas, mainly the events happening within the Middle East, makes us ponder what’s coming across the horizon for the world to endure. We see death and destruction from all sides of the equation and shake our heads wondering why mankind simply cannot come to terms with its basic differences and live peacefully. But, the wonderful thing about Thanksgiving, Christmas, and the New Year is, if not only for a few days, mankind everywhere captures at least some sense of laying down its arms, placing aside political and religious differences, and attempts to see the good and not the bad of individuals around them. People seem to become a little kinder, happier, more gracious, and smile more often; all the while, momentarily placing things into their proper perspective.

The holidays, fortunately, have a way of bringing people together no matter their positions. Maybe it’s the lights on the trees and buildings, frost on the windows, positive quotations and images on social media, movement toward church pews as Christmas draws closer, or smiles on children’s faces as good ole’ Santa Claus begins making his yearly rounds at shopping malls. But, one thing is certain, this time of year makes the hardest of problems and most difficult of circumstances seem a little easier to solve.

Even though I prefer the warmth of spring and summer, I truly enjoy the holidays. For me, it’s not at all about brightly wrapped presents or meals which overflow our plates on Thanksgiving. It’s about the world stopping to acknowledge what brings us together in the first place. It’s about a peaceful co-existence with one another, a belief in God, and for those who are Christian, the birth of our lord and savior. It means hitting the reset button on New Years Eve, letting everyone everywhere start fresh again and look forward to new possibilities. The holidays are also about slowing things down a bit and letting the simpler things in life give us some added pleasure.

This holiday season, skate atop a frozen lake, chop down a real Christmas tree, give an anonymous gift to a needy child or family if you can, walk inside a church and clasp your hands, contact an old friend, make amends with someone you’ve been at odds with, or just pause a short while and give thanks for all that you have. The holidays are a special time each year. They give us hope and optimism; increase our desires, and anticipation of what’s to come. They make us feel a little closer to our dreams, increase the likelihood of new possibilities, and oh those New Years resolutions helping us loose a few, unwanted pounds.

The biggest thing I believe people should do during the holidays is look beyond its commercialization. Our televisions are already bulging with Christmas advertising pleading with us to spend and spend on the latest-and-greatest must-have items. Many are starting to feel stress from family and friends jockeying for position as to who does what, and where. Sure, I engage in all those things as well, but, I look upon the holidays as something more personal. It’s a time when faith is brought to light, the events of the last twelve months are reassessed, and new goals are placed on the drawing board. It’s a unique and magical time, and I wish you and yours the best of it all.

Happy Holidays!

To read more of Randy Mitchell's writing, visit his website @ www.theinspirationalwriter.com

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